Preserve Recipes

Index of Preserve Recipes

1.   Drying Grapes - Sun Dried Raisins
2.   Lemon Curd
3.   
Marmalade
4.   Fig Jam
5.   Pomegranate Jam or Jelly
6.   Pomegranate Juice
7.   Pomegranate Wine
8.   Grape Wine (White and Red)
9.   Tomato Sauce
10. Tomato and Apple Chutney

11. Tomato Puree 
12. Pickled Onions
13
. Peanut Butter



(1). Drying Grapes - Sun Dried Raisins

The great way of preserving some of your very ripe grapes is by sun drying them to produce raisins. The traditional way of doing so in Cyprus, is to mix wood ash and olive oil in hot water and dip bunches of sweetened grapes into the mixture before drying in the sun. 

Hang the bunches to dry, but cover with a breathable cloth to deter insects. Leave your grapes outside in the sun for about a month to fully dehydrate. Once dry cut them from the bunch but leave a little bit of stalk on each otherwise you will leave a hole for bacteria to enter. Wash the raisins to remove any dirt and dust and allow to dry. Store your raisins in an airtight container and rehydrate in hot water before use.

(2) Lemon Curd

Not strictly a jam as it includes eggs but very tasty and a completely different taste to any shop bought product. Once made treat yourself to some lemon curd tarts or muffins. Best made in small batches as it does not keep for very long. Keep refrigerated and use within 2-3 weeks or for longer storage freeze.

Ingredients - 4 medium sized lemons, 4 medium sized eggs, 120g of butter (or alternatively use olive oil) and 1kg of sugar.

Grate the lemons finely to remove the peel and squeeze out the lemon juice. Put the lemon juice, lemon peel, sugar and butter into a preserving pan and heat gently, whilst stirring continuously, until the butter melts and the sugar is fully dissolved. Remove from the heat and allow the mixture to cool. Meanwhile, beat the eggs and put them into a glass bowl which just fits over a pot of simmering water. Gradually add the lemon mixture and stir until thick. Remove from the heat and pour immediately into pre-sterilised jars 

(3) Marmalade


A simple and straightforward recipe for using freshly picked oranges.

Ingredients: 9 medium sized oranges, 2 lemons and 1.5kg of sugar



(1) Wash fruit and cut out any blemishes and peel thinly leaving the pith on the fruit.
(2) Remove as much of the pith as possible and quarter the fruit.
(3) Place the quartered fruit in a food processor and then into a blender.
(4) Thinly slice the peel.
(5) Place the fruit and thinly sliced peel into the pan and add the sugar.
(6) Bring to the boil for about 20 minutes, stirring occasionally.
(7) After 20 minutes check for setting by placing a small amount on a cold plate for a few minutes.
(8) Pour, whilst still hot, into sterilised jars and put on the lids.
(9) Once cooled, label, clean and store in a dark but cool area and use within 6 months but once
      opened keep in the fridge. 

(4) Fig Jam

A jam to make when the figs are ripe in October and November which is delicious mixed in porridge on a cold winters day.

Ingredients: 
(1) 1.2kg of figs;
(2) 1 green apple or home made pectin;
(3) 100ml of water;
(4) 50ml of freshly squeezed lemon juice
(5) 1.1kg of sugar

Wash the figs, cut off the hard stem and bottom and cut out any blemished skins. Chop the figs and apple very finely (the apple is not needed if you are using homemade pectin). Place the chopped fruit in a large bottomed pan and add the water, lemon juice and half the sugar. Gradually heat whilst stirring continuously until the mixture releases sufficient liquid and the sugar dissolves. Turn up the heat, add the remaining sugar, and continue stirring until the mixture boils. Boil hard for at least 15-20 minutes and check for setting by placing a small amount of jam on a cold saucer and after a minute check to see if a skin has formed. Continue boiling and checking until a skin forms on the tested jam. Once a skin is apparent, turn off the heat and pour the jam into cleaned and sterilised jars. Once cooled, keep in a cool and dark place and your fig jam will keep until the figs ripen again to make another batch.  

(5) Pomegranate Jam or Jelly

The listed ingredients are to make about 3  medium jars. 

1.1 litre of freshly squeezed pomegranate juice
2.150g of pomegranate seeds (from about 3/4 of a pomegranate) - leave the seeds out if you are making jelly
3. 800g grams of sugar 
4. 50 millilitre of freshly squeezed lemon juice of 1 lemon.
5. Finely chopped green apple or home made pectin (see under Apple preserving) if jelly making 

Mix the sugar with the juice in a pan and heat gently whilst stirring until the sugar dissolves. Add the rest of the ingredients and cook for about 45 minutes whilst stirring occasionally and skimming off any foam that appears. After 45 minutes  the jam should begin to set.

Setting can be checked by placing a small amount onto a small plate and after 30 seconds checking to see if a crust is apparent which means your jam or jelly has set. Once set pour into previously sterilised jars and, after cooling, store in a cool dark place until required.



(6) Pomegranate Juice

Freshly picked pomegranates can be stored for about 2 weeks or for up to 2 months in a fridge. If the seeds are removed from the fruit these can be frozen for up to a year.  An excellent method of storing pomegranates is to make juice which is both delicious and because it is high in anti-oxidants benefits your health. Simply wash your crop, chop into quarters and using a press squeeze out the juice. The juice can be enjoyed within 2-3 days if kept in a fridge or frozen for later consumption.

(7) Pomegranate Wine

Pomegranates can be made into a delicious wine. To make about 4.5 litres you will need:

6 large pomegranates
450 grams of raisins
900 grams of granulated sugar
2 teaspoons of wine acid blend (available from wine making suppliers)
Wine yeast
1 crushed campden tablet
4.5 litres of water

Quarter and press your pomegranates to extract the juice, add a litre of water and dissolve the sugar in the mixture by stirring. Pour into a sterilised demijohn, add 3.5 litres of boiling water and add the rest of the ingredients except for the yeast. Allow to stand for a few hours to cool to room temperature and then add the previously activated yeast. Fit the airlock and let nature takes its course. Once fermentation stops, remove the airlock and siphon the wine carefully into a sterilised demijohn whilst keeping the sediment at the bottom. Place a bung to seal the demijohn and leave to clear in a dark, cool place. This may take several months but once completed your wine is ready for bottling. If you can leave the bottles to stand for a year before drinking.

(8)  Grape Wine (White and Red) 

There is a great satisfaction from making your own wine from your own grapes and the taste can be as good as that bought in the shops. For the basic instructions go to Preserving and Storing your Produce. 

White Wine: To make a gallon of wine you will need to pick 5-6Kg of white grapes. After picking wash the grapes to remove any insects or soil. Remove the grapes from the stalks and place in a food grade plastic bucket. Crush the grapes, if ripe, they will crush easily. Add one crushed campden tablet and add a weight, such as a large plate, to keep the crushed grapes submerged. Place a cover over the crushed grapes and leave for 24 hours which will allow the natural enzymes to break down the pulp and allow the maximum possible amount of juice to be extracted.

The next day and to remove as much juice as possible use a nylon straining bag to squeeze out the juice. The remaining pips and skins can be returned to your compost area.

Pour the extracted juice into a pre-sterilised fermentation bottle, add pre-activated wine yeast and fit an airlock.

Leave in a warm place but dark place until fermentation is complete which will usually be between 2-3 weeks. 

Siphon the wine into a pre-sterilised fermentation jar ensuring the sediment stays behind. and top up with a similar wine or cooled boiled water and add a crushed campden tablet.  Fit an airlock and move to a cool and dark place to allow the wine to clear. Every 3 months repeat the process and add a crushed campden tablet and leave to clear.

Your white wine should be mature enough to bottle after 12 months. Siphon into pre-sterilised bottles and label and cork immediately. If you can, leave for a further 3 months before enjoying a glass or two.

Red Wine: To make one gallon you will need to pick 5-6Kg of red grapes. Once picked wash the grapes to remove any insects or soil. Remove the grapes from the stalks and place in a food grade plastic bucket. Crush the grapes, if ripe, they will crush easily. Add one crushed campden tablet and add a weight, such as a large plate, to keep the crushed grapes submerged. Place a cover over the crushed grapes and leave for 24 hours.

The next day and to remove as much juice as possible use a nylon straining bag to squeeze out the juice and add the pre-activated wine yeast. Return the pulp to the bucket which will allow the red pigmentation from the skins to colour the juice.

Ferment the juice and pulp in the bucket for a further 4-5 days, stirring once a day.

After 4-5 days press the pulp and pour the extracted juice into a pre-sterilised fermentation bottle and add sufficient cooled boiled water to top up and fit an airlock.

Leave in a warm but dark place until fermentation is complete which will usually be between 12-14 days. 

Siphon the wine into a pre-sterilised fermentation jar ensuring the sediment stays behind. Add a campden tablet, fit an airlock and move to a cool and dark place to allow the wine to clear. Repeat the process every 3 months and leave to clear.

Your red wine should be mature enough to bottle after 18 months. Siphon into pre-sterilised bottles and label and cork immediately. If you can, leave for a further 3 months before enjoying a glass or two.

(9) Tomato Sauce

The ingredients for making your tomato sauce are: 
1.5K of tomatoes
1 medium sized onion
2 cloves of garlic
2 tsp of mustard seeds
2 tsp of peppercorns
1 tsp of paprika
1 tsp of ground chilies
1 tsp of salt
2 whole cloves
a cinnamon stick
85g of sugar
a third of a cup of cider vinegar
juice from half a lemon

Wash and roughly chop the tomatoes, peel and dice the onion, peel and crush the garlic and add to a pan with the mustard seeds, peppercorn, paprika, ground chillies, salt, cloves and cinnamon. Simmer slowly for about 40 minutes, stirring frequently, until it reduces by about a third. Remove from the heat,  allow to cool and then blend in a food processor before sieving into a pan.  Add the sugar, vinegar and lemon juice and gradually heat, whilst stirring, to the boil and simmer for about 10 minutes. Once thick, pour into pre-sterilised jars and put the lids on. Store for up to a month in the fridge or sterilise  for longer storage. For information on how to sterilise your sauce go to the sauce making section on How to Preserve and Store Your Produce.

(10) Tomato and Apple Chutney

A fruity chutney which has a hint of ginger and a useful way of preserving soft or squashy tomatoes and apples.

Ingredients: 

1 medium sized onion
500g sultanas
500g apple
500g tomato
600ml vinegar
half a tsp of pepper
half a tsp of ginger
500g sugar

Skin and very finely chop the onion, cut the apples into small pieces and skin and chop the tomatoes. Heat the vinegar and gradually add the sugar, stirring continually until all the sugar has dissolved. Add all the remaining ingredients, bring to the boil whilst stirring and simmer gently for about one hour. Whilst simmering, ensure you stir occasionally, to stop the chutney sticking to the pan, and until the mixture thoroughly cooks down to a pulp. Whilst still hot, spoon into your pre-sterilised jars and seal immediately. When the chutney has cooled to touch, label and store in a cool and dark place to use within two years. Your chutney will improve with age and will taste much better after a month. Once opened store in the fridge.


(11) Tomato Puree

An excellent method of storing tomatoes for later use in all sorts of recipes. Wash the tomatoes and immerse them in boiling water to loosen their skins and peel. Chop tomatoes into small chunks and place in a stainless steel or enamel pan with a little water. Gradually bring to the boil whilst stirring and simmer  for about two hours. Spoon off the foam as it develops and continue to stir frequently. Add approximately one teaspoon of salt for every litre and stir until dissolved. Alternatively, if you prefer a sweeter puree add one tablespoon of sugar per litre and stir until fully dissolved. Allow to thoroughly cool and freeze in portion sizes relevant to your needs.

(12) Pickled Onions

Small onions or shallots, either red or white, are best for pickling. To produce a crisp and crunchy pickled onion takes time. The fist step is to thoroughly wash the onions to remove any soil and soak them overnight submerged in a brine solution of 120g of salt for every litre of water. After soaking, skin the onions and again keep fully submerged, using a plate as a weight, in fresh brine for a further three days. Then drain and pack tightly into pre-sterilised jars and fill with vinegar. You can alter the vinegar flavour to your own taste by either dissolving some added sugar or by pre-flavouring with spices such as cinnamon, peppercorns, bay leaves or cloves. If you prefer soft pickled onions rather than crispy this can be achieved by heating the vinegar and pouring over the onions into pre-warmed jars. Label, date and store your pickled onions in a cool and dark place and they should be ready to eat after about three months. Your pickled onions should keep for at least a year.

(13) Peanut Butter

Roast 500g of peanuts, turning occasionally, for twenty minutes at 150c. Once cooled, grind in a food processor, add salt to taste and sufficient olive oil to produce a spreadable consistency. If you prefer a slightly sweeter taste you can add sugar or honey to taste.  Store in a pre-sterilised jar and use within three months.

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